The increasing globalization of the world economy is a prominent area of public debate. Issues of interest include the following:

The determinants of international trade and multinational activity
The implications of international trade and multinational activity for welfare and the distribution of income
The effects of trade liberalization on firm and aggregate productivity
The organization of firm production activities around the world
National trade policies and the World Trade Organization (WTO)

Latest articles

The productivity effects of importing inputs: evidence from Hungary

Improved access to foreign inputs has increased firms’ productivity in a number of countries. Analysing data for Hungary, this research explores the channels through which imported inputs boost productivity and finds that the positive effects are particularly strong for foreign-owned firms.

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The dynamics of labor market adjustment to trade liberalization

How long should we expect the labor market transition following a trade liberalization episode to last? To what extent will the potential gains from trade be reduced due to the slow adjustment of the economy to the new trade equilibrium? What are the characteristics of the workers who will lose the most from trade liberalization?

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Prices, markups and trade reform

In our globalized economy, information about the costs, benefits, and distributional consequences of lowering trade barriers is essential to policymakers trying to decide if a particular agreement should be supported. This research fills an important gap in our knowledge concerning the effects of reducing trade barriers when firms have some degree of monopoly power.

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Climate change: the potential impact on global agricultural markets

Many fear that climate change will have severe effects on the global economy, particularly through the threat to food production and farmers’ earnings. This research suggests that much of the potential harm could be avoided if farmers can switch their crops in response to changing relative yields.

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